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Issues in the integration of religious education and worldviews education in an intercultural context

Issues in the integration of religious education and worldviews education in an intercultural context

At a political level, the focus on Humanism and lack of attention to other non-religious worldviews can be related to the influence of the Norwegian and British Humanist associations and their role in the development of the subject. Relative to the size of its population, Norway has one of the strongest Humanist Associations in the world, with a current membership of over 89,000, according to their own webpage (https://human.no/om- oss/english/ downloaded 16.9.2018). Historically, the Human-Etisk Forbund (HEF) has wielded considerable political power and its status is recognised in the statement of values (which refers to ‘values in Christian and Humanist tradition and heritage’) that underpins the constitution and education system (Skeie and Bråten 2014, 215). As noted above, HEF played a key role in the establishment of an alternative to Christian Education. Subsequently, it has challenged successfully aspects of policy related to the integrated subject, reflected in several reforms relating to the rights of parents and the Christian elements of the subject (Andreassen 2013). Although there have been criticisms of its campaigning, HEF’s ability to mobilise the support of teachers, parents and members of the minority religions is indicative of its
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Handbook for the Teaching of Religious Education

Handbook for the Teaching of Religious Education

The Secondary Curriculum for Form 1 and 2 reflects the aims and philosophy of the recently published draft National Curriculum Framework (2011) which aims at developing learners who are capable of successfully developing their full potential as lifelong learners. The achievement of these aims depends on the following cross-curricular themes for their success: eLearning; Education for Sustainable Development; Intercultural Education; Education for Entrepreneurship and Creativity and Innovation. This Form 1 and 2 curriculum document reflects the principle of diversity of student learning needs. It recognizes the reality present in society where students have various differences in backgrounds, aptitudes, interests, intellectual abilities, needs, language competence and learning styles. The Form 1 and 2 curriculum document provides scaffolding to ensure that learners are supported through appropriate teaching and learning approaches whatever their level.
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Robert Jackson. Signposts Policy and practice for teaching about religions and non-religious world views in intercultural education

Robert Jackson. Signposts Policy and practice for teaching about religions and non-religious world views in intercultural education

In short, the powerful efect of media discourse (including television news and the Internet) is clear, but students are also capable of formulating their own more independent positions. In relation to school these are important fndings. ■ According to the students, school is one of the few venues where they actually talk about religion and their experiences with religious diversity; school in general and religious education in particular can therefore play an important role. My studies of classroom interaction show that giving students the opportunity to share their views and to criticise dominant discourses, can enable them better to relate their knowledge and understanding of religions to their own personal and social development – but this requires input from the teacher (von der Lippe 2010; 2011a). The connection of the personal and the social in classroom interactions suggests ways in which personal refection
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Developing Intercultural Competence in English Language Teachers: Towards Building Intercultural Language Education in Colombia

Developing Intercultural Competence in English Language Teachers: Towards Building Intercultural Language Education in Colombia

Stage 3: The face-to-face interview. This data gathering conversational strategy (Brinkmann, 2013) was organised into four main parts: teachers’ presentation; their own learning processes of the English language; culture and language-and-culture teaching, and intercultural competences and ELT. These four angles aimed to contextualize teachers’ practices to encourage them to make sense of their experience. Once the process started, and following a conversational style (Brinkmann, 2013), a brief outline of the interview was given. Each interview roughly followed the thirteen main questions that had been refined after the pilot study, and it was developed through introductory questions, follow-up questions and probing questions (see Appendix 5). At the end of the interview, an open-ended question inviting the participant to add any other idea related to (inter) cultural language teaching was posed: “Would you like to add something more or share any particular thought about culture, interculturality or ELT in our context?” This last question was fundamental because all participants were eager to further contribute to the topic, and they had different concerns, remarks, suggestions and opinions which sometimes led to different emerging themes.
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Intercultural and Inter-Religious Dialogue in Europe: Are the EU and the Council of Europe Participants or Arbiters of the Dialogue

Intercultural and Inter-Religious Dialogue in Europe: Are the EU and the Council of Europe Participants or Arbiters of the Dialogue

Kirk  has  argued  that  cultural  dialogue  tends  to  emphasise  cultural  diversity  and  discontinuity  whilst  obscuring  continuities  such as  ‘common  humanity’. 66   At  the  same  time,  in  terms  of  hoped‐for  outcomes  to  inter‐religious  dialogue,   Kirk  ‘wonders  why  diffuse generalizations  are  considered  a  more  appropriate  way to  approach  inter‐ religious dialogue than a recognition from the outset that incompatible and mutually exclusive beliefs have to be  acknowledged and discussed.’ 67  Emphasising cultural discontinuities whilst simultaneously struggling to harmonise  religious claims  would  seem to  be  somewhat  illogical,  unless one  assumes the ideologically  driven  nature  of  the  promotion  of  intercultural  and  inter‐religious  dialogue  by  Europe’s  political  institutions.  In  reality,  European  institutions are  engaged  in pragmatic  efforts  to  construct  an  emerging  sense of  shared  European  identities  and  cultures. 68   The  drive  to  achieve  a  greater  unity  within  diversity  extends  to  cultural  and  religious  identities.  Yet  these still rest on under‐examined assumptions concerning the  relationship of culture and religion. The failure of  the EU  and  the Council of Europe to adequately  address this  relationship is reflected in their  apparent refusal to  listen to the claims of religious believers about how they themselves view the distinctions.  
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CRAFT AS A BOUNDARY TOOL FOR MULTI- AND INTERCULTURAL EDUCATION: A CASE IN TEACHER EDUCATION

CRAFT AS A BOUNDARY TOOL FOR MULTI- AND INTERCULTURAL EDUCATION: A CASE IN TEACHER EDUCATION

Studies on boundary crossing and boundary objects emphasize that boundaries carry potential for learning. However, it is not explicated how the craft could be used as a boundary in multi- and intercultural education. This research describes a case of using craft as a boundary to facilitate multi- and intercultural education. It first gives an overview on the Multi- and Intercultural Craft course including a theoretical part that was organized through a virtual platform, Moodle. The course included also a practical part, a project, where Finnish, exchange students and a group of immigrants from Burma met in the context of craft. The students (n = 14) were asked to write reflective essays about the course. In the qualitative analysis of essays, their learning experiences that appeared in the data, were examined. Three aspects of learning experiences were identified: first a cognitive aspect, which is about increased knowledge; second an affective aspect, which focuses on changing attitudes; and the third an interactive aspect, which is concerned with how to get on with people from different cultures.
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Islam and Religious Education in Turkey

Islam and Religious Education in Turkey

The Parliament amended two articles of the constitution in order to create the constitutional framework for the lifting of the ban in universities. Article 10, on Equality Before the Law, (All individuals are equal without any discrimination before the law, irrespective of language, race, color, sex, political opinion, philosophical belief, religion and sect, or any such considerations) was amended by adding to its last sentence,. . . “and in benefitting from all public services.” Article 42, on Right and Duty of Training and Education, was amended by adding the statement, “No one can be deprived of the right to receive higher education for reasons not openly mentioned by laws. The limits of the use of this right will be determined by law.” Prior to this date, the public ban on headscarves officially extended to students on university campuses throughout Turkey. Nevertheless, according to Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2007, “some faculty members permitted students to wear head coverings in class” (Turkey, 2008, March 11).
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Parental rights in religious upbringing and religious education within a liberal perspective.

Parental rights in religious upbringing and religious education within a liberal perspective.

In this work I shall show that, whilst there is a tension between liberal values such as personal autonomy on the one hand and forms of upbringing and education which develop faith on [r]

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Failures of meaning in religious education

Failures of meaning in religious education

While the purposes of RE are multiple and complex, at its core two competing impulses rub awkwardly against each other – the epistemological impulse to understand the nature of the thing-in-itself and the ethical impulse to appropriate the study of religion as a means to cultivate certain moral dispositions and attitudes (Grimmitt 1987). This conflation potentially gives rise to a crisis of meaning in so far as the first impulse must perforce rest on a position of substantive epistemic neutrality whilst the second must abjure, to a greater or lesser extent, such neutrality. This epistemic and ethical conflict in turn gives rise to a conflict with regard to the meanings of the activities themselves. Hence the anxieties (expressed in the Ofsted and other reports) concerning the efficacy of religious education may equally be themselves anxieties about meaning.
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New frontiers of religious education

New frontiers of religious education

by spirituality. “Children with Cystic Fibrosis reported a variety of religious/spiritual coping strategies they nearly always associated with adaptive health outcomes.” 69 Koenig, McCullough & Larson (2001) identified 16 studies of the relationship between religious involvement and blood pressure, 14 of which indicate that the more religious have lower blood pressure, especially lower diastolic blood pressure. 70 Seeman, Dubin and Seeman, (2003) concluded that “a prudent interpretation of the data might be that the evidence reported to date is generally consistent with the hypothesis that aspects of religiosity/spirituality may indeed be linked to physiological processes—including cardiovascular, neuroendocrine, and immune function—that are importantly related to health… aspects of religiosity/spirituality may indeed be linked to important physiological regulatory processes.” 71 We may recognise with Vialle, Walton and Woodcroft (2008) that:
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Self assessment in religious education

Self assessment in religious education

2007 'Commitment, compliance and comfort zones: the effects of formative assessment on vocational education students' learning careers' in Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & P[r]

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Motivation in secondary religious education

Motivation in secondary religious education

Furthermore, regarding the pupils' autonomy and independenceof thought, my field study data also show how they experience strong motivation when placing themselves in ethical debates.In [r]

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Religious pluralism in Ismaili Muslim religious education: from difference to diversity

Religious pluralism in Ismaili Muslim religious education: from difference to diversity

It appears that political situation affects the nature of relationships between Muslim and other communities in local settings. Milligan, Andersen, and Brym (2014) assessed tolerance in 23 countries and suggest that it is not Islam as a religion that has an impact on tolerance but the socio-economic political regime in which Islam is practiced. The studies highlight that political events impact on the way Muslims relate to the ‘other’ and vice versa. For instance, Ma'Oz’s (2011) edited book examines the way Muslims’ societies and states relate to Jews and Israel. Ma'Oz observes that although there is a theological basis to the relationship between the Jews and Muslims, in practice these relationships are blurred, ambivalent and are linked to local factors. Cohen (2011) observes that in the Middle East the attitude towards Jews became negative since the 1930s with the rise of Zionism, as Judaism came to be seen as a form of imperialism. Ahmadov’s (2011) case study of Azerbaijan finds that in general Muslim attitudes to Jews while not intrinsically negative, are nonetheless shaped by the Israel-Palestine conflict. Burdah (2011) writes that in Indonesia the attitude towards Jews is worsening due to coverage of the Israel-Palestine issue. Similarly, Nachmani (2011) argues that anti-Semitism among Muslims in Europe is affected by events unfolding in the Middle East. Similarly, the 9/11 attacks have strained the relationship between Islam and the West. Edmunds (2012) notices in the aftermath of 9/11, Bush declared ‘war’ against an ‘axis of evil’ using rhetoric couched in quasi-religious language. This language invoked God and suggested that the rule of law, human rights, democracy came out of Christianity, thereby promoting an allegedly ‘superior’ set of Western values rooted in Christianity, which had to triumph over the supposedly barbaric values of Muslims. Such rhetoric has increased intolerance of Islam and Muslims in the West.
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Ethnicity, Religion and Intercultural Education in the Curricula of European Studies

Ethnicity, Religion and Intercultural Education in the Curricula of European Studies

From this perspective, it is very important to mention that in each country, within the category of Europeanization and cultural diversity there are courses aiming to integrate local, national, and regional culture to the European identity (Checkel, J.T & Katzenstein P.J, 2010: 9). For example, there are courses on Slovenian culture in European context, Slovak Cultural Heritage in European Context or Poland in Europe. The integrative cultural and intercultural approaches became part of rediscovering and strengthening the European dimension of the national “symbols and rituals of power” (Donnan, H & Wilson Th. M., 1999: 63!86). A curriculum with European touch has to reflect the voices, hopes, and dreams of the students from diverse ethnic and social!class group contributing to shaping the European identity (Fligstein, N. 2010: 136).
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The Europeanisation of intercultural education? Responses from EU policymakers

The Europeanisation of intercultural education? Responses from EU policymakers

22 First and foremost, our interviewees referred to the Youth in Action Programme, which was established in the framework of the White Paper on Youth in 2001. The Paper suggests member states’ cooperation in four priority areas, involving participation, information, voluntary activities and a greater understanding and knowledge of youth. Furthermore, the Europe for Citizens Programme (formerly Citizens for Europe) was an additional dimension in the interviewees’ accounts. This Programme aims to bridge the gap between citizens and the EU by promoting an active European citizenship and by developing a sense of belongingness and a European identity. Therefore, the programme seeks to facilitate intercultural dialogue by enhancing mutual understanding and respect among European citizens (EACEA, 2011). Only some of the interviewees referred to European Programmes aiming to support national policies or educational measures related to intercultural education. However, all interviewees pointed to transnational mobility programmes as the major strand of such programmes. For example, ‘mobility programmes are actually intercultural education because intercultural education is a practice in order to be able to start intercultural contact and this is what it creates at the level of teachers, pupils and children’ (Ms Lucas). They argued that mobility facilitates intercultural dialogue and cultural exchanges among people. The interviewees cited teacher and student exchanges within the context of Comenius, Erasmus and Erasmus Mundus programmes. However, Ms Thompson mentioned the mobility of artists as an additional form of cultural interchange.
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The inmigrants’ associatons at Spanish School: A intercultural education proposal

The inmigrants’ associatons at Spanish School: A intercultural education proposal

We live in societies that are becoming increasingly pluralistic. According to Habermas, there is “constant evidence of how they drift further and further apart from the model of a National State with a culturally homogeneous population. Multiple lifestyles, ways of life, ethnic groups, religious faiths are on the increase (…)”. Citizens should be able to experience the use of their rights in terms of social security and the mutual recognition of the different ways of life and variety cultures. This is a society in which new ways of self- organisation are becoming apparent in its citizens, [4]. New citizen entities are coming into being such as NGOs, Foundations, social initiative Cooperatives… and those Associations aimed at protecting the rights of their members and to preserve acceptable living conditions to build a fairer, more committed and supportive society. These new entities arise as a consequence of the incapacity of the Government to ensure quality services for its citizens whether they may be autochthonous or immigrants and to report before public opinion certain problems not covered by the State.
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Defining Intercultural Education for Social Cohesion in Malaysian Context

Defining Intercultural Education for Social Cohesion in Malaysian Context

On June 26, 2015, the American Educational Research Association (AERA) issued an online Statement on the Charleston Shootings and Racism in the United States. The statement highlighted the deteriorating state of race relations in the country, a condition potentially capable of inciting appalling violence. Religion-, race-, or ethnicity-related conflicts have become a common occurrence in the world. In the present times, as diversity expands, the pattern of discourse suggests that mutual tolerance is experiencing diminution, making it a critical global issue. (Cummins, 2015; Fisher, 2013). The AERA statement, while expressing deep concern over this crisis, suggested school education as the most powerful medium to transcend this intense systemic problem across our societies. According to AERA, “education has both a responsibility and an opportunity” as a social institution to educate future citizens about race issues and foster mutual understanding and respect for each other. The statement further calls upon educators, practitioners, policy makers, and scholars to indulge in research initiatives to examine “how school environments may exacerbate race bias and racism” for social harmony (AERA, 2015). Schools are powerful institutions that not only impart literacy, numeracy, and scientific education for core subjects but also play a key role in character building and instilling citizenship among learners.
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On the cultivation of intercultural communicative awareness in college
English education

On the cultivation of intercultural communicative awareness in college English education

People can distinguish different things by contrasting, which can be also applied to culture education in college foreign language teaching. Learner can apply comparative principle so as to make comparisons between the target culture and the home culture by which they can find out the similarities and differences between the two cultures. One thing that should be kept in mind is that it is not the ends but the means to improve intercultural communicative skills [11]. As a language learner and a communicator, we should be familiar with the commonness and differences between the two cultures including thought patterns behavioral patterns values and the like. Just as the saying goes, do as Romans do. It is important to adopt different methods while dealing with different people.
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Intercultural Significance of Ethno mathematics:  Higher Education Implications

Intercultural Significance of Ethno mathematics: Higher Education Implications

this would need to prepare higher education students to work in a diverse, multicultural world, with recognition of the contributions the members of other cultural groups have made to mathematics. Mathematical intelligence in a sociocultural perspective produces a well-functioning educational system through culturally relevant mathematics curriculum that balances ethnomathematics with academic mathematics. The role of ethnomathematics, thus, in mathematics higher education is to show, that ethnomathematics provides academic mathematics with an important framework that can help transform mathematics into a discipline that is better able to contribute to attainment of the dream of an equitable and humane society. As logically analyzed through the implications to higher education of the significance of ethnomathematics of Malayan origin in academic mathematics instruction, Philippine higher education can implement a faculty retooling program to enhance the integration of socio culturally enriched instruction of Mathematics in the Modern World, stressing the innate relevance of ethnomathematics in the acquisition of mathematical intelligence across the academic interdisciplinary programs of college students who are of Malayan cultural origin.
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Religious Education in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Religious Education in Bosnia and Herzegovina

education reflected political changes. Religion went from being the main value system to being an enemy during the communist period, when it was to be expelled together with teachers who taught it. Just before, during and after the last war, borderlines between different ethnic groups were brought forward, and national awareness grew stronger and stronger. Religion, history and language became the main grounds for difference between the ethnic groups. In reality, language differences are very tiny, and though the three ethnic groups have a different view on history, religion is what separates them the most. This could be one of the reasons why it was extremely important to introduce religious teaching to the schools. The law was justified on the basis of respect for human rights and the assumption that the former system was discriminatory because it didn’t allow for religious teaching in schools. So in 1994, during the war, religion was introduced as a mandatory subject for the first time in the schools on the territory of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, which was at the time under control of the Bosnian Army. The same happened in Republika Srpska, just one year earlier, in 1993. Since then, there has been a continuous public debate about the role of religion and religious education in the educational system of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
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